16.7.19

Musical Update

Apparently I posted this music meme in September 2009, (update in 2011) so it feels appropriate to do another update now.  So, what musical groups have I seen? Anything new is marked with a *

Original List
David Bowie
Jethro Tull
Charles Aznavour
Bonnie Raitt (3 times)
Spyro Gyra
Rolling Stones
Eric Clapton
Lou Reed
Clannad
kd lang (3 times)
Li'l Ed & the Imperials / Koko Taylor
Charlie Musselwhite
Mary Chapin Carpenter
Bjork / Sigur Rus
Steely Dan
"Guns & Roses"
Blondie
Kiss / Aerosmith
Cat Power
Marianne Faithfull
2011 List
Eric Clapton (again)
Jeff Beck
Charlotte Gainsburg
AIR
Jessie Baylin
kd lang (again)
Sybarite5
Cima Trio
Blondie (again)
Bruce Daigroponte (left off original list)
David Johansen
Larry Coryell
Rachid Taha

2011-2019
Charlotte Gainsbourg (again)
Coeur du Pirate (3 times)
Alison Moyet
Bryan Ferry
Julia Haltigan
Camille O'Sullivan (3 times)
Duran Duran
Leonard Cohen
Jethro Tull Opera
Rolling Stones
Cyndi Lauper/Boy George
Bruno Mars
Jay Geils Jazz & Blues Review
Tom Petty
Sybarite 5 (3 times)
Steve Winwood
Blondie
Ray Davies

Nothing on the horizon, but who knows what the fall will bring.


9.7.19

Notes from Mt. Bookpile

As part of my goals to catch up, here's the reading from the first half of 2019.  I'm behind by about 17 books as of today, but one of my Massive Summer To Do List™ items is to maybe even get ahead by the time work starts again.

Autobiography/Memoir


Children's/Young Adult Fiction
Children's/Young Adult Non-Fiction
Children's/Young Adult Speculative Fiction
Fiction/Literature
Humor
Mystery/Thriller
Non-Fiction
Speculative Fiction

8.7.19

Notable Quotes

Perhaps I'm just getting old, but I want to swap toxic politics and the anxieties induced by social media for reliability and kindness.  I want to feel more cosy.

5.7.19

2018 Year End Reading Round-Up

305 books read - GOAL MET (goal was 300, so met and surpassed, albeit barely)!  Reviews are over at the reading blog, but there are many that didn't get reviewed because they were either picture books I "read" for MPOW's Mock Caldecott, while others fell into the "you can't talk about this" category for the Book Award Committee. 

So... here's the 2018 reading analysis (2017 numbers in parens):
number of books read in 2018: 305 (378)
best month: December/59 (August/63)
worst month:  January/15 (January/18)
average read per month:  24.4 (31.5)
adult fiction as percentage of total:  14 (59)
children's/YA fiction as percentage of total:  18 (17)

Advance Readers Copies: 163 (112)
e-books: 0 (3)
books read that were published in 2018: 323 (325)
books that will be published in the 2019: 4 (20)
five star reviews (aka "Must Read"):  21 (9)
one star reviews (aka "DNF"): 11 (8)

Mt. Bookpile was 330 in December 2017 and got to 255 by December 2018 (it's way above that right now, sadly).

Goal for 2019?  300 books, and as of today I'm 19 books behind. Sigh.

Notes from Mt. Bookpile

So... apparently I haven't posted one of these since September of last year.  As I've said, I'm a little behind.  Sigh.  Here's what I read for the rest of 2018:

Children's/Young Adult Fiction

Children's/Young Adult Speculative Fiction


Fiction/Literature

  • Perennials; Mandy Berman
  • Long Black Veil; Jennifer Finney Boylan
  • The Last Mrs. Parrish; Liv Constantine
  • The Misfortune of Marion Palm; Emily Culliton
  • Dead Letters; Caite Dolan-Leach
  • The Lake of Dead Languages; Carol Goodman
  • She Rides Shotgun; Jordan Harper
  • Secrets of Southern Girls; Haley Harrigan
  • Relativity; Antonia Hayes
  • The Sisters Chase; Sarah Healy
  • Seven Days of Us; Francesca Hornak
  • Be Frank With Me; Julia Claiborne Johnson
  • The Nanny Diaries; Emma McLaughlin
  • Pretend We Are Lovely; Noley Reid
  • The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo; Taylor Jenkins Reid
  • Follow Me Down; Sherri Smith
  • Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore; Matthew J. Sullivan
  • My Absolute Darling; Gabriel Tallent
  • Demi-Gods; Eliza Robertson
  • Young Jane Young; Gabrielle Zevin
  • The Girls at 17 Swann Street; Yara Zgheib

Mystery/Thriller


Non-Fiction

  • The Man from the Train; Bill James
  • City of Light, City of Poison; Holly Tucker

Picture Books

  • Nothing Stopped Sophie; Cheryl Bardoe
  • Hello Lighthouse; Sophie Blackall
  • The Stuff of Stars; Marion Dane Bauer
  • A Stone for Sascha; Aaron Becker
  • Adrian Simcox Does NOT Have a Horse; Marcy Campbell
  • Imagine! Raoul Colan
  • Islandborn; Junot Diaz
  • Ocean Meets Sky; Terry Fan
  • This Is the Nest That Robin Built; Denise Fleming
  • A House That Once Was; Julie Fogliano
  • Pie is for Sharing; Stephanie Parlsey Ledyard
  • Drawn Together; Minh Le
  • Julian Is a Mermaid; Jessica Love
  • If I Had a Horse; Gianna Marino
  • Night Out; Daniel Miyares
  • Dreamers; Yuyi Morales
  • Love; Matt de la Pena
  • Pignic; Matt Phelan
  • All the Animals Where I Live; Philip C. Stead
  • They Say Blue; Jillian Tamaki
  • Hello Hello; Brendan Wenzel
  • The Day You Begin; Jacqueline Woodson

Speculative Fiction

  • The Clairvoyants; Karen Brown
  • The Motion of Puppets; Keith Donohue
  • Curioddity; Paul Jenkins
  • The Shadow Land; Elizabeth Kostova
  • Beasts of Extraordinary Circumstance; Ruth Emmie Lang
  • The Bedlam Stacks; Natasha Pulley
  • The Goblins of Bellwater; Molly Ringle
  • Seance Infernale; Jonathan Skariton
  • The Dreamers; Karen Thompson Walker
  • The Light Between Worlds; Laura E. Weymouth
  • Crosstalk; Connie Willis

3.7.19

Can't even get this right!

Yesterday I saw this tweet:

My response was "behind".  And clearly, since I'm posting this on Day 183 of the year, nothing's changed in 24 hours.  Still very, very behind. 
Note: when queried, I confessed to being "Beto behind" as opposed to "Bernie behind" or "Bill de Blasio behind" - in other words, there's some hope of catching up.  

How did this happen?  This past academic year has been rough, to be honest.  Between my mother's death, work issues and health issues, things have slipped a little out of control.  Taking what a friend referred to as a cocktail of drugs to control my eye problems has had a seriously negative effect on my ability to do anything beyond work, and that was before realizing that my mother's health was in such serious decline that the end wasn't going to be years but months. 
Disclaimer: my grief is no where near my father's level (he's lost his two best friends, one (Mom) he'd been with for over 60 years, and a colleague he'd worked/researched/collaborated and taken an painting class with for nearly 50 years; and my eye issues are nothing compared to what others, including Mrs. T and two good friends from high school are battling.
As I said, there's hope.  My Massive Summer To Do List™ is premised on the fact that I can maybe get through all of it if I put in 2-3 hours of work/day before reading (yes, I'm behind on my 2019 reading goal, too). 

Stay tuned.

   

22.4.19

Flashing back

The past month has been overwhelming for me in many ways.  Work has been incredibly busy, there's some family stuff going on that is just adding to the sadness and angst of the past few months, and then there are two other things that have made me sad/stressed (strassed?).

When I lived in Switzerland in 1973/4 we got our news from The International Herald Tribune, which was a co-production of the Washington Post and The New York Times.  This was perfect for staying abreast of what was going on with Watergate and I would occasionally spend my allowance on a copy (when my parents weren't buying one).  Yes, I was a bit of a geek.  Ok, I still am.

So when this year's Spring Break included a trip to Amsterdam (the one in Europe, not the one in Central NY) at the same time that there were going to be two big developments, the Manafort sentencing and Brexit votes, I was excited to see what the IHT would say.  But there's no IHT, it went defunct in 2013.  But there is an international edition of the NYT so that's just as good, right?

Nope.  Here's the front page of the NYT the day Manafort was sentenced and the day of the big Brexit vote:



The Boeing MAX pane being grounded and Facebook's problems?  WHAT????  I have a friend who works for this edition of the Times, and I do understand the business model.  But still... these are two fairly major news stories and the NYT totally failed.  

Then, last week, the fire at Notre Dame.  During my several trips to Paris it's been a required destination; when I was in Paris for eight weeks I went to Sunday Vespers weekly, and when I was there in 2012 I lit a candle for my uncle (who had died only a day before).  So there was that sense of loss, that a "friend" wasn't going to be there when I next visited.  And totally self-centeredly there was also a feeling that I'd seen this before, in 2007, when the library I worked in burned down.  Now, I'm not comparing the loss of a cultural/religious landmark like Notre Dame to a school library, but the images of the firemen with their hoses and the flames were similar enough to make me want to crawl under all my covers and never come out.   The good news is that as with my library, Notre Dame will rebuild. 


5.3.19

Is this real?

Today, checking the spam folder for the library's account (not my "personal" work account, the library's account) I found this message:


Not only did MPOW point out that this message didn't come from gmail, the address itself says that (see the "via Yahoo" at the top?).  Plus, I'm pretty sure that Mr. Koch wouldn't send out random emails like this, especially not to an "individual" with an email address that's clearly a building.

Still, for a few moments it was nice to dream.

13.2.19

A Valentine's Day cautionary tale

(this was supposed to be published in December, but then life got very complicated... the sentiment still holds, so here it is)

Recently I read this article in WaPo about how The Donald regifted even monogrammed items, even those given to him by his son. Forget who this is about, focus on the idea of "regifting" and the pain (or amusement) it can cause.

There are many moments when we're supposed to give a gift: an engagement, a wedding, a birth, birthdays, Valentine's Day, Christmas/Hanukkah, and many more.  Teachers get gifts before Winter Break and before Summer Break, usually from advisees or grateful students (or parents).

One year, a student at one of my schools gave me a gift.  This student, and a sibling and their mother, had become friends of mine (we're still in touch nearly 20 years later) and it was a lovely gesture.  Or so I thought.  Of course, you don't unwrap the gift right there in front of the student, you smile and say "thank you" and wait until later, right?  Which is what I did. 

And when I unwrapped the gift, there was a gift tag on it.  From this student's uncle to the mother. 

Because we were friends, the next time I saw the mother I mentioned the gift - it was so typical of this student that that's what they'd have done, I was amused more than angry, but also, what if she'd been looking for that gift?  Or worse, if the uncle had asked about it?  Her response was a chuckle, a sigh, and an "Ohhhh, [name]... No, I didn't know about this."  She'd suggested a number of items as a gift and this had been near them, but it wouldn't be a problem if I either wanted to keep it or give it back.  I kept it as a reminder of both this family and the dangers of regifting.

As Valentine's Day approaches, do your due diligence if you're regifting: take off any tags, and make sure you weren't given the gift by the person you're giving it to (or that it wasn't given by someone who will see you've regifted it and be offended).

6.2.19

Maybe it's me

I've been told by some that I can be too sensitive, that I read too much into things. So perhaps this is one of those time, that what I'm seeing isn't really there.  You be the judge.

Let's forget that those heartwarming "do a DNA test with your mother/father and get closer as a family" ads on tv are really painful to those who have lost a parent or who are adopted and would have no biological family with whom to share the results.  And let's forget all the issues around finding out that your family may not, biologically, be your family after all.

What I'm upset about is this recent ad, where a man discovers that his family is not, in fact, Italian.


 Instead it's.... Eastern European.  Not as specific as Italian, just generic "Eastern European".  And the tone in which 'Katherine' says Eastern European is one of disgust.

So here's my problem.  I (and virtually all my family) are "Eastern European" - Ukraine, Hungary, Poland, Lithuania and Russia all count as the Old Country for them.  There's a word after Eastern European that I didn't add, but is added by Ancestry: Jewish.

Ancestry.com is based in Utah.  Owned by Mormons.  Perhaps I'm being overly sensitive (again).  You tell me.